Dr. Ann's Blog

By marketing@mobilehealthteam.net
April 02, 2018
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Simple Blueberry Smoothie
Recipe courtesy of Amy's Healthy Baking
  • ½ cup frozen unsweetened blueberries 
  • ½ medium banana, sliced and frozen 
  • ¾ cup plain nonfat Greek yogurt 
  • ¾ cup Unsweetened milk of choice (almond, soy, cow's, etc.) 
  • 2 cups ice cubes (optional)

 

By marketing@mobilehealthteam.net
April 02, 2018
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Food for Thought
by Debbie Woelfel, Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator


This year's National Nutrition Month® theme, Go Further with Food, can have many different meanings. Athletes will tell you that food can make a difference between first and second place. The Winter Olympics just finished, and I read many stories about how different athletes worked with dietitians to make sure they had their best performance. 

What? You say you're not an athlete? No worries. There are many other ways to Go Further with Food. Eating a healthy diet can help prevent/delay different diseases, give you more energy and even just help make your day better. Studies have shown that children who eat breakfast score better on tests. Think how productive the workplace could be if everyone had a quick meal on their way out the door! 

In the last few years, there has been an increase in helping the environment. One way to do that is to reduce food waste. Thirty-one percent of all edible food is wasted in the United States. American households throw away nearly 28% of fruits and vegetables. With a little bit of planning you can help eliminate this waste and eat healthy. Here are a few tips.


Reduce Food Waste 
1. Check your refrigerator prior to going shopping. Eat what you have at home before buying more. 

2. Freeze extra food. Fruits and vegetables can be frozen for smoothies, hot cereal, soups and casseroles. Make sure you wrap items in heavy freezer paper, plastic wrap, freezer bags or foil. Above all, label it with the date and what type of food it is! I can't tell you how many times I thought I would remember...  

3. Plan your week. This can be the best step to eating healthy, reducing waste, and saving money at the grocery store. An easy way to do it is to list your schedule on the left half of the sheet and then the meal ideas on the right side. 

 Soccer - Leftover chicken, rice and green beans  
 Nothing - Pork tenderloin, baked potato, broccoli, peaches 
 Meetings - Pork sandwich, tortilla chips/salsa, raw vegetables

When meal planning think about cooking extra on the weekend. Cook once and eat twice. Make extra chicken so the first night is chicken, a few days later you have chicken enchiladas and a different day chicken barley soup. 

Double recipes and freeze half. If you are cooking for two just halve the original recipe. This might mean instead of a 9x13 casserole you divide it between two smaller pans - one for dinner and one for the freezer. Crock pot meals can be put in gallon bags on the weekend and then just dumped in the crock pot on the day you want it.  

There are lots of ideas on the internet/library for ways to freeze meals and save space. Need help with this step? Give us a call and we can help you brainstorm! 

What other ways can you Go Further with Food? Check out this link for more ideas.
www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month
www.choosemyplate.gov/national-nutrition-month
 

By marketing@mobilehealthteam.net
April 02, 2018
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Starting Seeds
by Debbie Woelfel, Registered Dietitian, Certified Diabetes Educator


Can you feel it? Spring is in the air! The warmer weather makes me want to get in the yard and start gardening. It is not too early to get a head start. 

Grab some old egg cartons, throw some dirt in it, plant your seeds, find a warm sunny place and watch your garden grow! Don't forget to water them occasionally. 

Wondering which seeds to start? According to Jung Seed Magazine, now is a good time to start cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant.

By marketing@mobilehealthteam.net
March 26, 2018
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When My Son Received an Obesity Diagnosis (Part II)
by Angela, Registered Dietitian 

 

Hello again, and thank you for joining me for this next section of my blog post on my son and his obesity diagnosis.  In my first post I discussed what BMI is and why this particular number is used in conjunction with growth charts to monitor children.  Here is an article about why BMI is important for physicians to use when assessing children: click here.  While pediatricians have been given guidance to use BMI to help address and correct childhood obesity, they may not have the tools to discuss this sensitive topic in a way that is meaningful to families.  As I’ve spoken to other parents, I’ve realized that the confusing and frustrating experience we had is common.  It is important that parents like you and me can work hand in hand with our doctors to manage our children’s weight, and feel like we are on the same page.  

I am a registered dietitian and because I knew where to look, I was able to access the information I needed to help me manage my son’s health after I left our doctor’s office. I wanted to share some of my favorite resources with you so that if you have concerns about your child’s weight, you can walk into your doctor’s office prepared to have a meaningful and positive discussion.  I’m hopeful that these resources will also allow you to walk out of your appointment prepared to take charge of your child’s health.

This article has a list of topics that parents who think their child may have a weight issue should consider before stepping into their doctor’s office: click here.

In addition to reviewing this article, be prepared to discuss your child’s eating, activity and sleep habits with your doctor or nurse.  Lack of adequate sleep, inactivity and excess calorie intake can all lead to weight gain.  If the doctor or nurse sees some sort of pattern that can be addressed by habit change, this is where it will become evident.

If during your office visit you find that your child’s BMI falls into the overweight/obese category, here are some resources that you may find useful:

  • General guidelines for calories required for children based off of age, gender and activity level: click here.
  • Portion sizes for both adults and children have been increasing steadily over the years.  This website has useful articles on portion sizes and healthy eating and recipes to make mealtimes more fun and engaging for children: click here.
  • This website can help you create balanced meals and it also has a wealth of information about healthy eating and lots of fun activities that you can do with your children to get them involved in their own health: click here.
  • If you feel your child should be more active, click here for some excellent tips.
  • The AAP Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight was designed to help connect pediatricians to parents in order to provide a united front in regards to obesity.  Click here to learn more.  

As you click through all of the ideas and tips on the websites I’ve provided, if you find something that is helpful for you and your family, be sure to share it with your physician.  They don’t necessarily have time to find all of the resources that can help parents (as their focus is often on more critical care) but a good doctor will welcome information that can assist their patients’ families.  

I hope that you find the links I’ve shared useful and helpful.  As always, feel free to comment with your questions or concerns!  I wish you and your children the best of health.

By marketing@mobilehealthteam.net
March 26, 2018
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When My Son Received an Obesity Diagnosis (Part I)
by Angela, Registered Dietitian
 

For anyone who is new to Dr. Ann’s blog, let me introduce myself. My name is Angela Bilbrey and I am a registered dietitian, an avid runner, a community advocate for healthier schools and most importantly, a mom to two lovely children. I am well aware of the obesity crisis that our nation is facing and the impact obesity has on our children. That awareness didn’t prepare me for my son’s obesity diagnosis or the awkward and confusing dialog that followed with our doctor and his staff. My hope is that by sharing our story we can help other parents avoid the helplessness and frustration we felt that day in the doctor’s office.

We had gone to our pediatrician’s office for a routine checkup when my son was six-years old. I knew that he had grown a lot over the year as he had skipped an entire clothing size. The physician who saw us that day didn’t mince words. He simply said that our son had gained too much weight over the past year and had jumped from the middle of the BMI (Body Mass Index) percentile range to the 95th percentile. My heart sank as he added, “We are really concerned that your son could be prediabetic or diabetic and he also may have abnormal cholesterol levels and liver function.”

Up to that point, I had considered my son’s weight gain and growth to be normal, as he looks exactly like the other children in our family did at his age. I never thought his rapid growth might be a sign of underlying disease until those words came out of the doctor’s mouth. It was at that moment that a bit of panic began to weave its way into my heart. My mind was overwhelmed with the thought that my son was sick with a serious illness and I was completely unaware.

I would like to point out that the pediatrician we saw that day was not our usual pediatrician, and perhaps the conversation between the doctor and myself would have been a bit different had it been a provider that knew our family. Instead, our exchange was extremely uncomfortable and strange, as the doctor stumbled over his words regarding my son’s diagnosis. I knew that due to concerns over promoting negative body image and eating disorders the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) had issued a clinical report in August 2016 regarding how pediatricians are to speak to children and parents about obesity. It was clear to me that the doctor was trying to avoid saying my son was obese, but had absolutely no other words to draw from to identify what he was diagnosing him with. At the time, the AAP was working on a resource to help guide this very delicate conversation and now it is available for physicians to use, click here. In the future, I am hopeful that the information and role-play scenarios located on the site will help to make the obesity conversation easier between physicians and families.

In addition to our conversation being limited by the reluctance of the doctor to say the word “obese,” it was plagued by what I felt was a serious lack of listening to the answers I provided about my son’s eating and activity patterns. As I stated before, I am a dietitian and I watch what my children eat. My son in particular dislikes juice and only drinks milk or water – but the doctor insisted that couldn’t be the case. The doctor also was insistent that my son must be sedentary and likely had too much screen time even though I told him repeatedly that my son plays several sports and is active all year. It was extremely frustrating to have the doctor and his nurse insist that our family must have done something they considered “wrong” that had caused his weight gain. In 2017 the AAP issued a policy on weight stigma that would have been helpful for the pediatrician and his staff to utilize during our appointment. Stigma in healthcare unfortunately does exist, and in our case the doctor’s stigma towards obesity in children derailed our appointment.

Although our experience wasn’t ideal, I am thankful that the doctor followed AAP protocol and raised an alarm in regards to my son’s weight gain. The AAP policy regarding childhood obesity states “BMI (Body Mass Index) between 85th and 95th percentile for age and sex is considered at risk of overweight, and BMI at or above the 95th percentile is considered overweight or obese”. My son certainly met the criteria to be diagnosed as obese, and without a regular checkup and evaluation I would have been unaware. In order to rule out obesity related illnesses, I agreed to bloodwork to test for diabetes, and to check my son’s liver function and cholesterol levels. Thankfully, all of the lab tests came back normal and my son’s weight has stabilized since our appointment.

I want to take a moment to review why BMI is used to evaluate children. BMI is a calculation that uses weight and height in order to screen for possible weight issues that can lead to future health problems. BMI provides pediatricians with another reference to monitor children’s growth. In addition, a child’s BMI measurement is consistent with an adult’s BMI measurement, and it can be used throughout a person’s life, unlike growth charts. I am providing this resource from the CDC that explains the use of BMI and also provides information on how BMI is calculated, click here. Research has shown that that an elevated BMI in children tracks to an elevated BMI for adults. Click here to read more about the research and the very serious consequences of carrying extra weight.

It’s important that the conversation parents have with their child’s doctor regarding their child’s weight is productive and not confusing and frustrating like mine was. One way to help facilitate this conversation is to be aware of how obesity is diagnosed, which I’ve covered in this blog post. In my next post, I will provide information and links to help you manage the obesity conversation with your doctor and also provide reference materials to help you manage your child’s weight at home. Thank you for joining me on this journey!





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